Diagnostic Kits

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Gamma Check E

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The Gamma Check E test is designed to be a rapid screening test for foals, using whole blood or serum. It was developed as a semi-quantitative means of measuring the foal’s IgG level. This test offers results within 5 minutes and can be done “mare side”. No special equipment is needed and the test can be run as early as 8 hours post-foaling allowing time for oral colostrum supplementation. A positive result indicates that the IgG level is greater or equal to 800 mg/dl.

CAUTION: False positive results are occasionally seen when samples are hemolyzed or when a foal has a high fibrinogen level. If the foal is not healthy, we do not recommend using the test. As false negatives do occasionally occur, we do not recommend transfusing a foal with plasma based only on the results of the Gamma Check E test. If the foal tests negative, we suggest repeating the test using the Foal RID test for quantitative results.

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Gamma Check C

The Gamma Check C test screens equine colostrum for “adequate” gamma globulin. In doing so, it provides a simple means of selecting only high quality colostrum for supplementation and banking. This test works on both fresh and thawed colostrum and provides results in 10 minutes with a solid clot indicating an IgG of 3800 mg/dl or greater. The test results also aid in identifying foals at risk for Failure of Passive Transfer, allowing time to implement preventative measures to protect the foal.

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Gelmate Test Kit

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The Gelmate Test Kit is for the detection of acute and chronic inflammation in farm animals. The higher the concentration of inflammatory proteins, mainly gammaglobulin and fibrinogen, the quicker the formation of a solid clot when whole blood is added to the reagent. The history of the patient is important as inflammation within a few weeks of testing may result in a positive Gelmate even if the problem has resolved. Examples of conditions causing elevations in inflammatory proteins: pleurisy, internal abscesses, peritonitis, traumatic reticuloperitonitis. False readings can occur with severe anemia (excessive plasma) or severe dehydration (reduced plasma).

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